How Weddings Work – The Charge

Many couples are confused when I mention The Charge. It stems from a traditional American ceremony. Historically, the wording goes, “Let me charge you both to remember that a happy marriage is found in mutual support…” and then goes on to mention several actions, emotions, and beliefs that aid in a long and happy relationship. Some couples choose not to have a formal Charge, instead opting for a short homily or Words of Wisdom, especially if you’ve just had a reading or prayer.

The focus of The Charge is to bring you both into NOW, giving you one last moment to decide if this major life step is right. More often, however, it brings your minds back to the present, to this significant moment in your lives – something you will not want to forget due to anxiety or emotion.

The Charge helps to define what Marriage is to you, and express that to your guests. It also makes a nice buffer between a prayer or reading, and what comes next – the start of the heart of the ceremony, the “I Do’s,” or Intent.

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Customized Wedding Ceremonies

The only words required at a wedding are “I Do.”  Beyond that, it’s all up to you.  OglethorpeCrop

I strive to be Atlanta’s best wedding officiant by crafting custom ceremonies for each and every couple I marry.

As an independent ordained minister, I create and officiate over personalized ceremonies that come from your heart. From ancient rituals to modern traditions, I will ensure that your wedding vows are truly meaningful, and the ceremony perfectly reflects your lives together.
Contact me today to learn more about how we can work together to craft your ideal wedding.
404.296.0909      beyondido@mindspring.com
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As Seen in New York Times

It was an honor and a thrill to be interviewed for a New York Times article on the growing trend of couples personalizing religion for their weddings. The article does an excellent job of illustrating the reasons I am so passionate about creating custom ceremonies.

Click here for the full article

The Rev. Meghan Gurley in Avondale Estates, Ga., on Thursday. Ms. Gurley received her online ordination from the Universal Life Church in 2009.  Credit Kevin Liles for The New York Times

The Rev. Meghan Gurley in Avondale Estates, Ga., on Thursday. Ms. Gurley received her online ordination from the Universal Life Church in 2009. Credit Kevin Liles for The New York Times

.A special thanks to Kevin for meeting me at Lake Avondale to capture this picture.